Fire Safety Plan

FIRE SAFETY PLAN PART I:
BUILDING INFORMATION SECTION

BUILDING REPRESENTATIVE:

Orsid Realty Corporation, 1740 Broadway, New York, NY 10019 – 212–247–2603
875 West End Avenue, New York, NY 10025 – Lobby: 212–866–1212

BUILDING INFORMATION:

Year of Construction: 1913
Type of Construction: Non-Combustible
Number of Floors: 15 floors above ground (no 13th floor); 1 floor below brade
Sprinkler System: No
Fire Alarm: No
Public Address System: No

MEANS OF EGRESS:

Type of Egress ID Location Leads to
Exit West End Avenue side of the building Main entrance Lobby floor exits onto West End Avenue
Exit Lobby floor, west side of the building From the lobby floor to courtyard exiting onto West 103rd Street
Exit Basement level at 103rd Street 103rd Street, west side of the building Elevator access only – no stairs to basement
Enclosed Interior Stair A West side of building From the roof to street level exiting directly onto West 103rd Street
Unenclosed Interior Stair B Southeast of the building From the roof to the lobby
Enclosed Interior Stair C Northwest side of the building From the roof to the lobby
Unenclosed Interior Stair D Center side of the building From the roof to the lobby
Enclosed Interior Stair E Southeast side of the building From the roof to the lobby
Fire Escape Southeast side of the building serving the F line apartments From the roof to street level courtyard to West 103rd Street

Additional Information: No access to adjoining buildings at the roof level. Prepared: Nov. 3, 2010

FIRE SAFETY PLAN PART II:
FIRE EMERGENCY INFORMATION

875 West End Avenue New York, NY 10025

THIS FIRE SAFETY PLAN IS INTENDED TO HELP YOU AND THE MEMBERS OF YOUR HOUSEHOLD PROTECT YOURSELVES IN THE EVENT OF FIRE. THIS FIRE SAFETY PLAN CONTAINS:

  • Basic fire prevention and fire preparedness measures that will reduce the risk of fire and maximize your safety in the event of a fire.
  • Basic information about your building, including the type of construction, the different ways of exiting the building, and the types of fire safety systems it may have.
  • Emergency fire safety and evacuation instructions in the event of fire in your building.

PLEASE TAKE THE TIME TO READ THIS FIRE SAFETY PLAN AND TO DISCUSS IT WITH THE MEMBERS OF YOUR HOUSEHOLD. FIRE PREVENTION, PREPAREDNESS, AND AWARENESS CAN SAVE YOUR LIFE!

IN THE EVENT OF A FIRE CALL 911 OR THE FIRE DEPARTMENT DISPATCHER, at:

  • Manhattan (212) 999-2222
  • Bronx (718) 999-3333
  • Brooklyn (718) 999-4444
  • Queens (718) 999-5555
  • Staten Island (718) 999-6666

OR TRANSMIT AN ALARM FROM THE NEAREST FIRE ALARM BOX

BASIC FIRE PREVENTION
& FIRE PREPAREDNESS MEASURES

These are fire safety tips that everybody should follow:

  1. Every apartment should be equipped with at least one smoke detector. Check them periodically to make sure they work. Most smoke detectors can be tested by pressing the test button. Replace the batteries in the spring and fall when you move your clocks forward or back an hour, and whenever a smoke detector chirps to signal that its battery is low. The smoke detector should be replaced on a regular basis in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendation, but at least once every ten years.
  2. Carelessly handled or discarded cigarettes are the leading cause of fire deaths. Never smoke in bed or when you are drowsy, and be especially careful when smoking on a sofa. Be sure that you completely extinguish every cigarette in an ashtray that is deep and won’t tip over. Never leave a lit or smoldering cigarette on furniture.
  3. Matches and lighters can be deadly in the hands of children. Store them out of reach of children and teach them about the danger of fire.
  4. Do not leave cooking unattended. Keep stove tops clean and free of items that can catch on fire. Before you go to bed, check your kitchen to ensure that your oven is off and any coffeepot or teapot is unplugged.
  5. Never overload electrical outlets. Replace any electrical cord that is cracked or frayed. Never run extension cords under rugs. Use only power strips with circuit-breakers.
  6. Keep all doorways and windows leading to fire escapes free of obstructions, and report to the owner any obstructions or accumulations of rubbish in the hallways, stairwells, fire escapes or other means of egress.
  7. Install window gates only if it is absolutely necessary for security reasons. Install only approved window gates. Do not install window gates with key locks. A delay in finding or using the key could cost lives. Maintain the window gate’s opening device so it operates smoothly. Familiarize yourself and the members of your household with the operation of the window gate.
  8. Familiarize yourself and members of your household with the location of all stairwells, fire escapes and other means of egress.
  9. With the members of your household, prepare an emergency escape route to use in the event of a fire in the building. Choose a meeting place a safe distance from your building where you should all meet in case you get separated during a fire.
  10. Exercise care in the use and placement of fresh cut decorative greens, such as Christmas trees and holiday wreaths. If possible, keep them planted or in water. Do not place them in public hallways or where they might block egress from your apartment if they catch on fire. Keep them away from any flame, including fireplaces. Do not keep for extended period of time; as they dry, decorative greens become easily combustible.

BUILDING INFORMATION

Building Construction

In a fire emergency, the decision to leave or to stay in your apartment will depend in part on the type of building you are in.

Residential buildings built before 1968 are generally classified either as “fireproof” or “nonfireproof.” Residential buildings built in or after 1968 are generally classified either as “combustible” or “non-combustible.” The type of building construction generally depends on the size and height of the building.

A “non-combustible” or “fireproof” building is a building whose structural components (the supporting elements of the building, such as steel or reinforced concrete beams and floors) are constructed of materials that do not burn or are resistant to fire and therefore will not contribute to the spread of the fire. In such buildings, fires are more likely to be contained in the apartment or space in which they start and less likely to spread inside the building walls to other apartments and floors. THIS DOES NOT MEAN THAT THE BUILDING IS IMMUNE TO FIRE. While the structural components of the building may not catch fire, all of the contents of the building (including furniture, carpeting, wood floors, decorations and personal belongings) may catch on fire and generate flame, heat and large amounts of smoke, which can travel throughout the building, especially if apartment or stairwell doors are left open.

A “combustible” or “non-fireproof” building has structural components (such as wood) that will burn if exposed to fire and can contribute to the spread of the fire. In such buildings, the fire can spread inside the building walls to other apartments and floors, in addition to the flame, heat and smoke that can be generated by the burning of the contents of the building.

Be sure to check Part I (Building Information Section) of this fire safety plan to see what type of building you are in.

Means of Egress

All residential buildings have at least one means of egress (way of exiting the building), and most have at least two. There are several different types of egress:

Interior Stairs: All buildings have stairs leading to the street level. These stairs may be enclosed or unenclosed. Unenclosed stairwells (stairs that are not separated from the hallways by walls and doors) do not prevent the spread of flame, heat and smoke. Since flame, heat and smoke generally rise, unenclosed stairwells may not ensure safe egress in the event of a fire on a lower floor. Enclosed stairs are more likely to permit safe egress from the building, if the doors are kept closed. It is important to get familiar with the means of egress available in your building.

Exterior Stairs: Some buildings provide access to the apartments by means of stairs and corridors that are outdoors. The fact that they are outdoors and do not trap heat and smoke enhances their safety in the event of a fire, provided that they are not obstructed.

Fire Tower Stairs: These are generally enclosed stairwells in a “tower” separated from the building by air shafts open to the outside. The open air shafts allow heat and smoke to escape from the building.

Fire Escapes: Many older buildings are equipped with a fire escape on the outside of the building, which is accessed through a window or balcony. Fire escapes are considered a “secondary” or alternative means of egress, and are to be used if the primary means of egress (stairwells) cannot be safely used to exit the building because they are obstructed by flame, heat or smoke.

Exits: Most buildings have more than one exit. In addition to the main entrance to the building, there may be separate side exits, rear exits, basement exits, roof exits and exits to the street from stairwells. Some of these exits may have alarms. Not all of these exits may lead to the street. Roof exits may or may not allow access to adjoining buildings.

Be sure to review Part I (Building Information Section) of this fire safety plan and familiarize yourself with the different means of egress from your building.

Fire Sprinkler Systems

A fire sprinkler system is a system of pipes and sprinkler heads that when triggered by the heat of a fire automatically discharges water that extinguishes the fire. The sprinkler system will continue to discharge water until it is turned off. When a sprinkler system activates, an alarm is sounded.

Sprinkler systems are very effective at preventing fire from spreading beyond the room in which it starts. However, the fire may still generate smoke, which can travel throughout the building.
Residential buildings are generally not required to have fire sprinkler systems. Some residential buildings are equipped with sprinkler systems, but only in compactor chutes and rooms or boiler rooms. All apartment buildings constructed or substantially renovated after March 1999 will be required by law to be equipped with fire sprinkler systems throughout the building.

Be sure to review Part I (Building Information Section) of this fire safety plan to learn whether your building is equipped with fire sprinkler systems.

Interior Fire Alarm Systems

Although generally not required, some residential buildings are equipped with interior fire alarm systems that are designed to warn building occupants of a fire in the building. Interior fire alarm systems generally consist of a panel located in a lobby or basement, with manual pull stations located near the main entrance and by each stairwell door. Interior fire alarm systems are usually manually-activated (must be pulled by hand) and do not automatically transmit a signal to the Fire Department, so a telephone call must still be made to 911 or the Fire Department dispatcher. Do not assume that the Fire Department has been notified because you hear a fire alarm or smoke detector sounding in the building.

Be sure to review Part I (Building Information Section) of this fire safety plan to learn whether your building is equipped with an interior fire alarm system and whether the alarm is transmitted to the Fire Department, and familiarize yourself with the location of the manual pull stations and how to activate them in the event of a fire.

Public Address Systems

Although generally not required, some residential buildings are equipped with public address systems that enable voice communications from a central location, usually in the building lobby. Public address system are different from building intercoms, and usually consist of loudspeakers in building hallways and/or stairwells.

Be sure to review Part I (Building Information Section) of this fire safety plan to learn whether your building is equipped with a public address system.

EMERGENCY FIRE SAFETY & EVACUATION INSTRUCTIONS

In the event of a fire, follow the directions of fire department personnel. However, there may be emergency situations in which you may be required to decide on a course of action to protect yourself and the other members of your household.

This fire safety plan is intended to assist you in selecting the safest course of action in such an emergency. Please note that no fire safety plan can account for all of the possible factors and changing conditions; you will have to decide for yourself what is the safest course of action under the circumstances.

General Emergency Fire Safety Instructions

  1. Stay calm. Do not panic. Notify the Fire Department as soon as possible. Firefighters will be on the scene of a fire within minutes of receiving an alarm.
  2. Because flame, heat and smoke rise, generally a fire on a floor below your apartment presents a greater threat to your safety than a fire on a floor above your apartment.
  3. Do not overestimate your ability to put out a fire. Most fires cannot be easily or safely extinguished. Do not attempt to put the fire out once it begins to quickly spread. If you attempt to put a fire out, make sure you have a clear path of retreat from the room.
  4. If you decide to exit the building during a fire, close all doors as you exit to confine the fire. Never use the elevator. It could stop between floors or take you to where the fire is.
  5. Heat, smoke and gases emitted by burning materials can quickly choke you. If you are caught in a heavy smoke condition, get down on the floor and crawl. Take short breaths, breathing through your nose.
  6. If your clothes catch fire, don’t run. Stop where you are, drop to the ground, cover your face with your hands to protect your face and lungs and roll over to smother the flames.

Evacuation Instructions If The Fire Is In Your Apartment
(All Types of Building Construction)

  1. Close the door to the room where the fire is, and leave the apartment. 2. Make sure EVERYONE leaves the apartment with you. 3. Take your keys. 4. Close, but do not lock, the apartment door.
  2. Alert people on your floor by knocking on their doors on your way to the exit.
  3. Use the nearest stairwell to exit the building.
  4. DO NOT USE THE ELEVATOR.
  5. Call 911 once you reach a safe location. Do not assume the fire has been reported unless firefighters are on the scene.
  6. Meet the members of your household at a predetermined location outside the building. Notify responding firefighters if anyone is unaccounted for.

Evacuation Instructions If The Fire Is Not In Your Apartment

“NON-COMBUSTIBLE” OR “FIREPROOF” BUILDINGS:

  1. Stay inside your apartment and listen for instructions from firefighters unless conditions become dangerous.
  2. If you must exit your apartment, first feel the apartment door and doorknob for heat. If they are not hot, open the door slightly and check the hallway for smoke, heat or fire.
  3. If you can safely exit your apartment, follow the instructions above for a fire in your apartment.
  4. If you cannot safely exit your apartment or building, call 911 and tell them your address, floor, apartment number and the number of people in your apartment.
  5. Seal the doors to your apartment with wet towels or sheets, and seal air ducts or other openings where smoke may enter.
  6. Open windows a few inches at top and bottom unless flames and smoke are coming from below. Do not break any windows.
  7. If conditions in the apartment appear life-threatening, open a window and wave a towel or sheet to attract the attention of firefighters.
  8. If smoke conditions worsen before help arrives, get down on the floor and take short breaths through your nose. If possible, retreat to a balcony or terrace away from the source of the smoke, heat or fire.

“COMBUSTIBLE” OR “NON-FIREPROOF” BUILDING

  1. Feel your apartment door and doorknob for heat. If they are not hot, open the door slightly and check the hallway for smoke, heat or fire.
  2. Exit your apartment and building if you can safely do so, following the instructions above for a fire in your apartment.
  3. If the hallway or stairwell is not safe because of smoke, heat or fire and you have access to a fire escape, use it to exit the building. Proceed cautiously on the fire escape and always carry or hold onto small children.
  4. If you cannot use the stairs or fire escape, call 911 and tell them your address, floor, apartment number and the number of people in your apartment.
  1. Seal the doors to your apartment with wet towels or sheets, and seal air ducts or other openings where smoke may enter.
  2. Open windows a few inches at top and bottom unless flames and smoke are coming from below. Do not break any windows.
  3. If conditions in the apartment appear life-threatening, open a window and wave a towel or sheet to attract the attention of firefighters.
  4. If smoke conditions worsen before help arrives, get down on the floor and take short breaths through your nose. If possible, retreat to a balcony or terrace away from the source of the smoke, heat or fire.

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